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Baked stuffed tomatoes recipe

Baked stuffed tomatoes recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes

Ripe tomatoes are hollowed out and filled with a stuffing mixture made with bacon, breadcrumbs, green pepper and Parmesan cheese.

210 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 6 slices bacon
  • 6 medium tomatoes
  • 85g (3 oz) chopped green pepper
  • 4 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan
  • 20g croutons or breadcrumbs
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 6 sprigs parsley

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:25min ›Ready in:45min

  1. Preheat oven to 180 C / Gas mark 4. Grease an 18x28cm (7x11 in) baking dish.
  2. Place bacon in a large, deep frying pan. Cook over medium high heat until crispy. Drain on kitchen paper, dice and set aside.
  3. While bacon is cooking, wash tomatoes and slice off stem ends. Gently scoop out pulp, leaving a 2cm deep wall. Finely chop pulp and place one third of it in a medium bowl. Discard remaining pulp, or reserve for another use.
  4. Stir bacon, green pepper, Parmesan cheese, croutons, salt and pepper into tomato pulp. Spoon an equal amount of mixture into each hollowed out tomato. Place stuffed tomatoes into prepared baking dish.
  5. Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, until heated through. Garnish with parsley sprigs.

Tip:

This is such a versatile dish - serve for brunch with scrambled eggs, for lunch with a crisp green salad, or as a starter.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(99)

Reviews in English (80)

by CookinGheri

Used different ingredients.Absolutely delicious! Once the tomato was stuffed, I topped with some breadcrumbs, parm cheese and a little olive oil. Thanks Anita!-15 Sep 2008

by KEBLE

Altered ingredient amounts.One of the most succesful recipes I have tried off of this site; my brother and I really enjoyed this. After reading the comments from a few reviewers, I upped the ingredients to avoid running out of stuffing, of course I ended up with too much, but the mixture is so flavourful that it can be combined with lettuce for a great salad or mixed in with other vegetables.-15 Sep 2008

by SCHLUH

Used different ingredients.These were better than I expected - I was trying to use up some leftover garden tomatoes. I used six small to medium tomatoes and only had enough stuffing for five - so I would be more generous when making the filling. I used pecorino romano cheese and some fresh snipped basil too.-15 Sep 2008


Classic Tomates Farcies (Baked Ground Meat-Stuffed Tomatoes)

A typical recipe from Provence , these Classic “Tomates Farcies” are the perfect addition to any Summer table. This unfussy recipe of ripe tomatoes, carved and filled with a stuffing of ground meat, herbs, bread and cheese is a staple dish in any French household – and a personal childhood favorite of mine. Naturally, this dish is best made at the peak of tomato season, when they are juicy, sweet and full of flavor.

An old timey dish from Provence, Tomates Farcies were born as a way to make a smart use of any leftover meat, bread and fresh herbs people had in the kitchen. For this reason, you can still today find countless variations of this dish: made with ground beef, pork, chicken or chopped up leftover stewed meat, mixed with stale bread or rice, any kind of fresh herbs and any type of hard cheese.

Today’s recipe includes ground chicken, parsley, stale bread and parmesan – but feel free to take some liberties if you wish, by using a different meat, herbs or cheeses (keeping the proportions and baking time the same).


How to Make Stuffed Tomatoes

A summer tomato is a thing of incomparable beauty. Even the gnarliest scarred heirloom of late August tastes divine, sweet and acidic and intensely like a tomato—entirely different from the bland specimens we make do with the rest of the year. But even when they’re not quite at their peak, roasting them is an easy way to concentrate their flavor. And stuffing them is a good move in any case.

My grandmother used to hollow out raw tomatoes and pack them with cheese, which was a simple and delicious summer snack I don’t revisit often enough. I should, because eating as many raw tomatoes as humanly possible is the closest I come to participating in a summer sport, but aside from making sandwiches, tossing them in salads, and devouring them right out of hand with a sprinkle of salt, it’s nice to find other ways to enjoy them. Really good raw tomatoes make great edible bowls for all sorts of things, from tuna salad to Texas caviar. And baked stuffed tomatoes are also terrific.

They’re fairly self-explanatory and easy-going, but here are the basic steps.

How to make stuffed tomatoes:

1. Pick tomatoes that are large enough to easily work with (even once you cut the tops off) and that sit relatively flat so they don’t roll all over the place. That said, you can totally stuff tiny cherry tomatoes if you don’t mind the tedium!

2. Peel them if you prefer (but not if you’re baking). This is completely optional, but if you’re sensitive to the skins, cut a small x into the bottom of each tomato, gently drop them into a pot of boiling water for 30 seconds, then lift them out with a slotted spoon into a bowl of ice water. The skins should slip right off. This makes handling the tomatoes a more delicate operation, so be extra careful not to puncture their sides, and don’t stuff in too much filling lest it pull a Kool-Aid Man and burst right through. If you’re baking the tomatoes after stuffing them, skip this step, since the skin will help hold them together but be easy to peel away from each tomato once they’re cooked.

3. Carve the tops off and scoop the insides out. Think of each tomato as a mini pumpkin you can slice the top clean off (in which case, save the “hats” for A+ presentation), but if you want to keep more of the tomato intact, carve out a plug shape with a sharp paring knife, making it larger than the natural scar from where the stem was attached, but stopping short of the total circumference of the fruit. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds and discard them (or save them to use as “tomato caviar”), being careful not to scrape too deep. You may need to use your knife to cut through the inner membranes attached to the walls of the tomato first if your spoon isn’t cutting it—but again, be gentle. Set the hollow tomatoes upside down on paper towels to drain the juice, or if it’s too tasty to waste, drain them over a rack set on a rimmed baking sheet so you can collect the nectar and add it to sauces, dressings, or drinks.

4. Stuff them! Use your spoon to gently pack in whatever filling sounds good to you, from herb-flecked cream cheese to raw corn and avocado. Or go with cooked ground beef or turkey, and/or cooked rice or quinoa, even crack an egg in there (if you’re baking them).

5. Bake them if you want to. While stuffed raw tomatoes are perfect during peak season, cooked stuffed tomatoes taste great even when the star ingredient isn’t all that stellar (but even better if they are ripe, of course). If you want to bake them, especially if you’re using wan winter tomatoes, roast the tomato “shells” on their own for about 10 minutes, then stuff them and finish baking, to ensure they soften and intensify in flavor. Sprinkling salt and pepper inside the tomato cavity before stuffing doesn’t hurt either.


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I actually had leftovers of them once, when I doubled the recipe. Happily, leftovers keep well in the fridge, in an airtight container, for 2-3 days. And they are very tasty after a gentle reheat in the microwave on 50% power.

As I said, I love cooking eggs inside vegetables. Examples? Sure! I have quite a few!

  • These portobello baked eggs are wonderful. Really tasty!
  • I also make bell pepper eggs quite often.
  • My family loves baked avocado egg. The avocado becomes so creamy.
  • And these bacon and egg cups are super cute! My daughter loves making them with me.

More Ideas For Stuffed Tomato Recipes

Tomatoes (along with zucchini!) make excellent containers for salads. If you like these Greek stuffed tomatoes, you might also like some of these salads. Stuff them into tomatoes – no need to bake these!

    – This easy chicken salad recipe is packed with flavorful herbs. Simple, healthy, & naturally low carb chicken salad that’s ready in just a few minutes! – This easy tuna egg salad recipe is ready in just 10 minutes. Perfect to make ahead. – This quick and easy tuna and avocado salad needs just 7 ingredients! The perfect combination of flavors for healthy stuffed tomatoes.

How to make easy stuffed tomatoes with ground meat

You&rsquoll want to scoop out the seeds on all of the tomatoes and cut the bottoms so they sit nicely without rolling. And, you can use any size to stuff with meat and cheese.

For the cheese, I chose a Monterey Jack. I don&rsquot recommend buying the pre-shredded kind as starch is typically added as an anti-caking agent.

It&rsquos best to slice up blocks of cheese to use in low carb recipes. And, a hand grater or food processor is perfect for freshly grating your cheese.

Feel free to use any cheese you have on hand for these yummy stuffed tomatoes with meat. I love sharp cheddar on ground burger meat.

Monterey Jack is a good choice to go with the sausage meat. To ensure the meat was surrounded by the cheese, I first lined the inner of the tomato with slices, then added the meat with a small spoon. Grated cheese tops it off!

The final step is to just bake them in the oven. They should be done in about 5 to 8 minutes at 350°F. The result is certain to please all you cheese lover&rsquos out there.


Baked Stuffed Parmesan Tomatoes

Last week, we spotted some gorgeous tomatoes at the market – so I immediately asked my husband Jack to make his delicious Baked Stuffed Parmesan Tomatoes!

This is a recipe that Jack served at many catered dinners back during his food service days, but it’s so simple to prepare, you could easily serve it as a side dish to a weeknight dinner.

These Baked Stuffed Parmesan Tomatoes start by first slicing tomatoes in half horizontally and removing the seeds. Then the tomato is stuffed with crispy panko breadcrumbs that are mixed with a blend of Parmesan and Romano cheese, fresh minced garlic, and a blend of seasonings and herbs, including fresh mint – which totally makes this dish! (If you’ve never added mint to a tomato recipe – don’t be afraid to try it! The touch of mint included in the recipe adds a great fresh flavor that is a perfect complement to the tomato flavor.)

These Baked Stuffed Parmesan Tomatoes are particularly good served alongside a nice steak or other grilled foods – but I also enjoy them as a meatless meal served alongside a salad. Enjoy!


How to Make Stuffed Tomatoes

A summer tomato is a thing of incomparable beauty. Even the gnarliest scarred heirloom of late August tastes divine, sweet and acidic and intensely like a tomato—entirely different from the bland specimens we make do with the rest of the year. But even when they’re not quite at their peak, roasting them is an easy way to concentrate their flavor. And stuffing them is a good move in any case.

My grandmother used to hollow out raw tomatoes and pack them with cheese, which was a simple and delicious summer snack I don’t revisit often enough. I should, because eating as many raw tomatoes as humanly possible is the closest I come to participating in a summer sport, but aside from making sandwiches, tossing them in salads, and devouring them right out of hand with a sprinkle of salt, it’s nice to find other ways to enjoy them. Really good raw tomatoes make great edible bowls for all sorts of things, from tuna salad to Texas caviar. And baked stuffed tomatoes are also terrific.

They’re fairly self-explanatory and easy-going, but here are the basic steps.

How to make stuffed tomatoes:

1. Pick tomatoes that are large enough to easily work with (even once you cut the tops off) and that sit relatively flat so they don’t roll all over the place. That said, you can totally stuff tiny cherry tomatoes if you don’t mind the tedium!

2. Peel them if you prefer (but not if you’re baking). This is completely optional, but if you’re sensitive to the skins, cut a small x into the bottom of each tomato, gently drop them into a pot of boiling water for 30 seconds, then lift them out with a slotted spoon into a bowl of ice water. The skins should slip right off. This makes handling the tomatoes a more delicate operation, so be extra careful not to puncture their sides, and don’t stuff in too much filling lest it pull a Kool-Aid Man and burst right through. If you’re baking the tomatoes after stuffing them, skip this step, since the skin will help hold them together but be easy to peel away from each tomato once they’re cooked.

3. Carve the tops off and scoop the insides out. Think of each tomato as a mini pumpkin you can slice the top clean off (in which case, save the “hats” for A+ presentation), but if you want to keep more of the tomato intact, carve out a plug shape with a sharp paring knife, making it larger than the natural scar from where the stem was attached, but stopping short of the total circumference of the fruit. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds and discard them (or save them to use as “tomato caviar”), being careful not to scrape too deep. You may need to use your knife to cut through the inner membranes attached to the walls of the tomato first if your spoon isn’t cutting it—but again, be gentle. Set the hollow tomatoes upside down on paper towels to drain the juice, or if it’s too tasty to waste, drain them over a rack set on a rimmed baking sheet so you can collect the nectar and add it to sauces, dressings, or drinks.

4. Stuff them! Use your spoon to gently pack in whatever filling sounds good to you, from herb-flecked cream cheese to raw corn and avocado. Or go with cooked ground beef or turkey, and/or cooked rice or quinoa, even crack an egg in there (if you’re baking them).

5. Bake them if you want to. While stuffed raw tomatoes are perfect during peak season, cooked stuffed tomatoes taste great even when the star ingredient isn’t all that stellar (but even better if they are ripe, of course). If you want to bake them, especially if you’re using wan winter tomatoes, roast the tomato “shells” on their own for about 10 minutes, then stuff them and finish baking, to ensure they soften and intensify in flavor. Sprinkling salt and pepper inside the tomato cavity before stuffing doesn’t hurt either.


Baked Stuffed Tomatoes Tips

There are a few tricks to stuffed baked tomatoes. You want to buy tomatoes that are not fully ripe – they’ll hold together better. Salting the scooped out tomatoes and letting them drain upside down helps remove excess moisture. And they should bake just long enough to heat the filling. Do not – and I say this from experience – stick your finger in them to check if the stuffing is hot. They may burst. The baking time here is just enough. I like to spread them out on a baking sheet rather than doing them in a casserole dish so that the moisture that bakes out of them can spread away.